Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Pharaoh Athletics' Prototype Hyper Shoes




Pharaoh Athletics, have produced a prototype motion-controlled shoe for athletes called Hyper Shoes To fund the project the company created a range of high-quality products, including t-shirts, hats, hoodies and tank tops, for online purchase. All proceeds from the sales will go towards Pharaoh Athletics' required target of $25,000 to make the first Hyper Shoes available for purchase.



The new motion-controlled shoes have been designed for play and training on grass or turf using technology that allows athletes to accelerate faster without expending added energy. According to the manufacturer, the wearer benefits from improved body posture, balance and ability to maneuver, as well as added protection from ankle injuries when executing sideways moves, stopping, or changing direction.



The Hyper Shoes are the creation of Mosimo Jones and have taken five years to develop. They contain a midsole chassis designed to hold the weight of the athlete and respond to extreme playing conditions. A secure heel cup and strategic cushioned padding for high pressure areas. Pharaoh Athletics are preparing to launch their Hyper Shoes late in 2017.



Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Coffee and sneakers




In Brisbane, there is a new coffee shop. Nothing particularly unusual in that, except the Street Lab Specialty Coffee is not just a simple café, it’s a coffee dispensary, roaster and shoe outlet all rolled into one. Not just barista to serve but the cafe boasts of shelves of limited-edition sneakers imported from specialty suppliers. Street Lab Specialty Coffee caters to both coffee elite and sneakerheads, offering perfectly poured coffee and a stock of blue chip kicks. Street Lab Specialty Coffee, is at the Emporium, Shop 1, 1000 Ann Street, Fortitude Valley.

Monday, December 12, 2016

Where did the deubré come from: Je ne sais quois




If you are a certain age, Thingummyjig (1976–83) was a Scottish Television program showcasing the best in haggis, heather and tartan talent. The program was hosted by the acerbic, Jack McLaughlin (aka “The Laird o’ Coocaddens”). The origins of the term ‘thingamajig’ (n), in its many spellings, remain unclear but may stem from Middle English ‘thing’, derived from Old English þing, from Proto-Germanic *þingą. The word originally meant "assembly", then came to mean a specific issue discussed at such an assembly, and ultimately came to mean most broadly "an object". Thingamajig appears in the English language around 1824, but is predated by thingumbob (1751), and thingummy (1796). Synonyms include: dohickey, doohickey, doodad, doover (Australia), doomaflatchy, gizwiz, kadigan, thingamabob, thingumabob, thingummybob, thingo (Australia), thingummy, whatchamahoozie, whatnot, whatsit, and whatchamacallit. Something whose name has been forgotten or is not known.. The earliest recorded variant of ‘whatchamacallit’ is what-calle-ye-hym, attested from late 15c. A modern equivalent, origin unknown, is the Scottish term ‘doobrie,’ meaning something unspecified whose name is either forgotten or not known; a thingy or whatsit. < br>


The collective name for given to these words is placeholders which typically function grammatically as nouns and can be used for people, objects, locations, or places. Most are documented in at least 19th century literature.



In 1994, Damon Clegg, a Nike footwear designer, when presenting features of his design for a Nike ACG boot, and when he came to describe the ornamental shoelace tag, (which lacked a name). he instinctively used the term ‘doobrie.’ Clegg had heard his college roommate use the placename when he was unable to remember a specific name. His college friend was from Glasgow. The audience took the term ‘doobrie’ for a technical term, and the word caught on. Over time, the pronunciation evolved to doo-bray with various spellings. Eventually with the publication of a catalogue for the Nike Air Force 1 in 2006, Nike introduced the "deubré".



The deubré has two holes through which the shoelace is threaded, like a bead on string. When the shoe is laced, the deubré is centered between the first two eyelets (closest to the toe), with the shoelace passing through and behind the deubré. A deubré is typically made of metal, plastic, or leather, and may be decorated with a logo or text. Sometimes the deubré acts as a lace lock, eliminating the need for tying. A deubré may be used on a dress shoe or an athletic shoe.



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